Tips On Filing For Personal Bankruptcy

Tips On Filing For Personal Bankruptcy

Personal bankruptcy laws in the United States are extremely complicated and very difficult to understand. Before deciding to apply for bankruptcy, it is important that you fully understand all bankruptcy laws, and know whether or not your financial situation will or will not be improved by filing for bankruptcy. Continue reading this article to learn about bankruptcy.

Trying to exclude family members you owe money to before filing for personal bankruptcy can get you into serious hot water. The court will look into who you pay-off as far as a year back, and if they find you showing favor to family over other creditors, they could invalidate your filing completely.

A critical tip in filing personal bankruptcy is to steer clear of making payments to creditors, in advance of filing a petition, in an attempt to satisfy individual debts in full outside of bankruptcy court. Payments to family members and creditors made within defined periods of time prior to a bankruptcy filing can be voided and can jeopardize the chances of receiving a discharge of all debts in the case.

Find out what the homestead exemption limit is in your state before filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. If you have too much equity in your home to qualify for the exemption, you could lose your house in the bankruptcy. You can’t change your mind once you’ve begun the process, so make sure you will be able to keep your home before you file.

Remember that certain kinds of debt won’t be discharged even after you have filed for bankruptcy. If you have outstanding student loans, owe child or spousal support, a divorce settlement agreement, or unpaid taxes, you will still be liable for these debts. Also, if you forget to list certain debts on your court documents, you won’t be able to add them in the future.

There are differences between Chapter 13 bankruptcy and Chapter 7; be sure to familiarize yourself with both. Go to a reputable website and research the benefits and detriments of each type of bankruptcy. If you don’t understand the information you researched, consult with your attorney about the details before you decide which type of bankruptcy you want to file.

If you lose your job, or otherwise face a financial crisis after filing Chapter 13, contact your trustee immediately. If you don’t pay your Chapter 13 payment on time, your trustee can request that your bankruptcy be dismissed. You may need to modify your Chapter 13 plan if, you are unable to pay the agreed-upon amount.

A great personal bankruptcy tip is to consider what kind of bankruptcy you’d like to go for. In general, chapter 13 is much better because it doesn’t taint your credit report. It allows you to hold on to most of your belongings. Chapter 7 is much more extreme to file for.

Knowing that you are required to disclose anything that you have sold, given away or transferred in the two years prior to filing can help you avoid a costly mistake. Full disclosure is required. Not disclosing everything can land you in jail or a discharge of your personal bankruptcy petition.

Protect your wages to live on. Bankruptcy is an important way to do just that. If you owe enough money that creditors are threatening to file lawsuits against you, it’s time to seek legal counsel. If a creditor sues you, they can obtain their money by garnishing your wages, taking a large chunk of change from your paychecks. This can put you in even more debt and make your situation worse. Filing bankruptcy will put a stop to any lawsuits and protect the money you need to survive. If the situation becomes dire, you can also ask for an emergency filing, so you don’t have to wait a couple of weeks for the attorney to compile all the information he or she needs.

Make sure to comply with the educational requirements for bankruptcy. You have to meet with an approved credit counselor within the six months before you file. You have to take an approved financial management course. If you don’t take these courses in time, the court will dismiss your bankruptcy.

A great personal bankruptcy tip is to take care of your monetary problems sooner, rather than later. You can always seek the help of counselors for free if you’re worried about your finances. Dealing with bankruptcy when it’s a bigger problem is not a situation you really want to be in.

If you are in deep personal debt, you may be able to improve your situation by applying for bankruptcy. Although America’s bankruptcy laws are very complex, by reading this article you should have a better understanding of them. Before filing for bankruptcy, it is important that you fully understand all of the pros and cons.

 

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