Personal Bankruptcy: Do I Have Any Choices?

Personal Bankruptcy: Do I Have Any Choices?

Bankruptcy can be such a negative experience, but with proper guidance and the right sources of information, it can be a positive solution to an otherwise, unbearable situation. If you are looking at bankruptcy, consider the advice of the following article. It should guide you through the process and see you through it, unscathed.

One you realize you are in financial trouble and have decided to file for personal bankruptcy you should move quickly. Waiting to the last minute to file bankruptcy can cause a number of issues. You may face negative repercussions such as wage or bank account garnishment or foreclosure on your home. You can also not leave time enough for a thorough review of your financial situation, which will limit your available options.

A huge mistake people make before filing for bankruptcy is maxing out their credit cards. This can lead to disaster when you file and the credit card companies might not discharge the debt. If you can, you need to stop using your credit cards at least six months before you file, and ideally for a year prior. Also, do your best to pay the minimum payments on these cards for at least six months before you file.

Do not get an attorney for your bankruptcy when you are feeling overwhelmed. You have got to be levelheaded when you hire a lawyer. After all, you will be expected to pay him/her for services. Find out upfront what you will have to pay any lawyer before you hire one.

When it comes time for you to hire an attorney to deal with your bankruptcy, be sure to find one that has a ton of experience with personal bankruptcy. Learn about the charges you will have to pay, and how many of their associates will be working on your case.

If you are facing a necessary filing for bankruptcy, take a break from your troubles. After seeking reliable legal advice but before signing on the dotted line, give yourself a few days to think it all over, make sure you have disclosed everything and that you have selected the best options. Bankruptcy is permanent and you will live with consequences for a long time to come.

You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from “bankrupt” to “debtor” so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

If you have financial issues due to something like a drinking, drug, or gambling problem, get help instead of immediately filing for bankruptcy. You will continue to have financial issues if you have serious problems with, spending lots of money on these items. Try getting into counseling as soon as you can, to better your situation.

If you have co-signers on car loans, or others who are responsible for your bills, consider filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy if you want to help them. If you file for Chapter 7, you may not have to pay anymore, but they are still responsible. Talk to the people involved, and think carefully before making a choice.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, be certain not to transfer any of your belongings or valuables to another person. This includes taking your name off of joint bank accounts or other financial assets. The court will be looking for anything of value in order to repay creditors, and you will be asked under oath whether you have left anything out. If you do not tell the truth, you may be charged with perjury and could possibly spend time in jail. Remember, honesty is the best policy.

Keep in mind that your credit is not necessarily ruined just because you have filed for bankruptcy. But, it is important once you have filed for bankruptcy, that you properly manage your finances. This is the only way that you are going to be able to rebuild your credit the right way.

Clean up your credit record after ten years. When you file Chapter 7 bankruptcy, it remains on your credit report for ten years. However, the credit bureaus are not required to remove the information. In order to get rid of the bankruptcy record, write a letter to the credit reporting agencies, along with a copy of your discharge notice. Follow this up with a phone call to make sure that they have removed the bankruptcy record.

Facing bankruptcy is hard enough in and of itself, therefore, you don’t need to go through the process blind and be subject to misguidance and further hardship. We hope this article has shed some light on the better ways of filing, the right people to turn to, and the best solutions for your personal circumstances.

 

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